My India My America: Success Yatra provides a historical picture of India, America and medical education through the experience of the author, Prabodh Gupta, MBBS, MD. Dr. Gupta has taken a walk back through his life to draw a picture of growing up in India and immigrating to America. This autobiography is divided into four parts following an introduction where the author discusses the background for writing the book – his “Yatra” meaning journey with a purpose or “journey of life” as he phrased it.

Part I depicts his childhood years growing up in India in the 1940’s. His father worked for the British India Railways which meant moving from city to city fairly frequently. Part I is divided according to the city he was living in and the time frame there. For example, he moved six times between 1942 and 1948. The partition of India and the creation of Pakistan occurred during this time period; therefore, he provides a glimpse of life during this time telling the reader of a 10 year old boy who “witnessed things that no child should.” We learn of his early childhood years walking long distances to school and what he and his brother Subodh did for fun.

While in high school, the author tells of his father and brother deciding that they need a doctor in the family, and so begins his years of tedious studying and hard work to fulfill his destiny. He enrolled in Hindu College, Delhi University for his premedical courses and then off to medical school at Medical College in Amritsar. We get a look at his life during these years with hours of studying and the hard work but also fun times he had with friends. Upon graduation, he is off to do his residency in internal medicine at Irwin Hospital in Delhi. After his residency, he did his post-graduation in Pathology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMA) New Delhi. Now we see this avenue in his life through his descriptions of his housing, the campus and the professors who would help shape his career. During this time, he started pursuing the subspecialty of Cytopathology.

Part II of the book begins with Dr. Gupta coming to America to start a research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) with a concomitant appointment as Teaching Fellow at Harvard Medical School in 1967. He describes MGH and Harvard with great detail to include the pathologists and cytotechnologists he worked with along with his research and publication endeavors. He applied for a position in the Pathology Department at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland and he was hired as an Instructor in the Pathology Department. His journey continues as he gets more involved in the field of cytopathology. It was during this time that he met and married his wife, Jean.
Dr. Gupta and his wife returned to New Delhi so that he can take a faculty position at AIIMS.

Part III begins with his return to India with his new American wife, describing her reaction to life there. Their daughter’s birth gave them both happiness and joy. However, the political climate was difficult especially towards the end of 1971 and a thirteen-day war between Indian and Pakistani forces.

A turning point came with a letter from Dr. John Frost offering Dr. Gupta a position at Johns Hopkins, and Dr. Gupta had to make a decision, stay in his country or move back to America. Part IV begins with his move back to America and his work at Johns Hopkins for 16 years. Then he was offered the Director of Cytopathology position at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), The Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. His work in the field of cytopathology takes off from here. He works on numerous publications and gets involved with national professional organizations such as the American Society of Cytopathology where he received the highest award – The Papanicolaou Award. This is just one of the many awards he has received. This book shows what an individual can achieve with hard work, diligence and willingness to take a risk in moving to a different country and culture.
provides a historical picture of India, America and medical education through the experience of the author, Prabodh Gupta, MBBS, MD. Dr. Gupta has taken a walk back through his life to draw a picture of growing up in India and immigrating to America. This autobiography is divided into four parts following an introduction where the author discusses the background for writing the book – his “Yatra” meaning journey with a purpose or “journey of life” as he phrased it.

Part I depicts his childhood years growing up in India in the 1940’s. His father worked for the British India Railways which meant moving from city to city fairly frequently. Part I is divided according to the city he was living in and the time frame there. For example, he moved six times between 1942 and 1948. The partition of India and the creation of Pakistan occurred during this time period; therefore, he provides a glimpse of life during this time telling the reader of a 10 year old boy who “witnessed things that no child should.” We learn of his early childhood years walking long distances to school and what he and his brother Subodh did for fun.

While in high school, the author tells of his father and brother deciding that they need a doctor in the family, and so begins his years of tedious studying and hard work to fulfill his destiny. He enrolled in Hindu College, Delhi University for his premedical courses and then off to medical school at Medical College in Amritsar. We get a look at his life during these years with hours of studying and the hard work but also fun times he had with friends. Upon graduation, he is off to do his residency in internal medicine at Irwin Hospital in Delhi. After his residency, he did his post-graduation in Pathology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMA) New Delhi. Now we see this avenue in his life through his descriptions of his housing, the campus and the professors who would help shape his career. During this time, he started pursuing the subspecialty of Cytopathology.

Part II of the book begins with Dr. Gupta coming to America to start a research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) with a concomitant appointment as Teaching Fellow at Harvard Medical School in 1967. He describes MGH and Harvard with great detail to include the pathologists and cytotechnologists he worked with along with his research and publication endeavors. He applied for a position in the Pathology Department at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland and he was hired as an Instructor in the Pathology Department. His journey continues as he gets more involved in the field of cytopathology. It was during this time that he met and married his wife, Jean.
Dr. Gupta and his wife returned to New Delhi so that he can take a faculty position at AIIMS.

Part III begins with his return to India with his new American wife, describing her reaction to life there. Their daughter’s birth gave them both happiness and joy. However, the political climate was difficult especially towards the end of 1971 and a thirteen-day war between Indian and Pakistani forces.

A turning point came with a letter from Dr. John Frost offering Dr. Gupta a position at Johns Hopkins, and Dr. Gupta had to make a decision, stay in his country or move back to America. Part IV begins with his move back to America and his work at Johns Hopkins for 16 years. Then he was offered the Director of Cytopathology position at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), The Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. His work in the field of cytopathology takes off from here. He works on numerous publications and gets involved with national professional organizations such as the American Society of Cytopathology where he received the highest award – The Papanicolaou Award. This is just one of the many awards he has received. This book shows what an individual can achieve with hard work, diligence and willingness to take a risk in moving to a different country and culture.
provides a historical picture of India, America and medical education through the experience of the author, Prabodh Gupta, MBBS, MD. Dr. Gupta has taken a walk back through his life to draw a picture of growing up in India and immigrating to America. This autobiography is divided into four parts following an introduction where the author discusses the background for writing the book – his “Yatra” meaning journey with a purpose or “journey of life” as he phrased it.

Part I depicts his childhood years growing up in India in the 1940’s. His father worked for the British India Railways which meant moving from city to city fairly frequently. Part I is divided according to the city he was living in and the time frame there. For example, he moved six times between 1942 and 1948. The partition of India and the creation of Pakistan occurred during this time period; therefore, he provides a glimpse of life during this time telling the reader of a 10 year old boy who “witnessed things that no child should.” We learn of his early childhood years walking long distances to school and what he and his brother Subodh did for fun.

While in high school, the author tells of his father and brother deciding that they need a doctor in the family, and so begins his years of tedious studying and hard work to fulfill his destiny. He enrolled in Hindu College, Delhi University for his premedical courses and then off to medical school at Medical College in Amritsar. We get a look at his life during these years with hours of studying and the hard work but also fun times he had with friends. Upon graduation, he is off to do his residency in internal medicine at Irwin Hospital in Delhi. After his residency, he did his post-graduation in Pathology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMA) New Delhi. Now we see this avenue in his life through his descriptions of his housing, the campus and the professors who would help shape his career. During this time, he started pursuing the subspecialty of Cytopathology.

Part II of the book begins with Dr. Gupta coming to America to start a research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) with a concomitant appointment as Teaching Fellow at Harvard Medical School in 1967. He describes MGH and Harvard with great detail to include the pathologists and cytotechnologists he worked with along with his research and publication endeavors. He applied for a position in the Pathology Department at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland and he was hired as an Instructor in the Pathology Department. His journey continues as he gets more involved in the field of cytopathology. It was during this time that he met and married his wife, Jean.
Dr. Gupta and his wife returned to New Delhi so that he can take a faculty position at AIIMS.

Part III begins with his return to India with his new American wife, describing her reaction to life there. Their daughter’s birth gave them both happiness and joy. However, the political climate was difficult especially towards the end of 1971 and a thirteen-day war between Indian and Pakistani forces.

A turning point came with a letter from Dr. John Frost offering Dr. Gupta a position at Johns Hopkins, and Dr. Gupta had to make a decision, stay in his country or move back to America. Part IV begins with his move back to America and his work at Johns Hopkins for 16 years. Then he was offered the Director of Cytopathology position at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), The Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. His work in the field of cytopathology takes off from here. He works on numerous publications and gets involved with national professional organizations such as the American Society of Cytopathology where he received the highest award – The Papanicolaou Award. This is just one of the many awards he has received. This book shows what an individual can achieve with hard work, diligence and willingness to take a risk in moving to a different country and culture.

Leigh Ann Cahill, CT(ASCP), The ASC Bulletin Editorial Board
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia